“The king hath commanded me a business,” by Louis A. Dole

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“The king hath commanded me a business.” – 1 Samuel 21:2

Readings

1 Samuel 21:1-9 · Luke 19:12-27 · Psalm 143

Sermon

Every man and every woman is a merchant. This fact the Scriptures use to inform us of the true nature of our life here. There is the parable of the talents and the command to lay up for ourselves treasures in heaven.

If in our external life our business continues to show losses, failure will inevitably result. The business of life is both natural and spiritual. We have spiritual possessions as well as natural. All our gains and losses, all our spiritual as well as our natural possessions are made by an exchange.

We need capital to commence business, and we recall that in the parable of the talents in Matthew it is written, “For the kingdom of heaven is as a man travelling into a far country, who called his own servants, and delivered unto them his goods. And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey.” In these terms are laid down the conditions on which spiritual prosperity depends. The kingdom of heaven is compared to a man traveling into a far country, who called his servants and delivered unto them his goods.

Two important truths are taught in both parables of the talents: first, that all things we possess, by the use of which we may attain eternal happiness, are a free gift to us from the Lord alone, and that if we make proper use of them, they are finally given to us as our own and are never taken from us; and second, that while we live in this world, we are left so much to ourselves that according to all appearance we are our own masters, independent of Him from whom all that we have is derived.

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“And Samuel said unto Jesse, Are here all thy children? And he said, There remaineth yet the youngest, and, behold, he keepeth the sheep,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And Samuel said unto Jesse, Are here all thy children? And he said, There remaineth yet the youngest, and, behold, he keepeth the sheep. And Samuel said unto Jesse, Send and fetch him: for we will not sit down till he come hither.
“And he sent, and brought him in. Now he was ruddy, and withal of a beautiful countenance, and goodly to look to. And the Lord said, Arise, anoint him: for this is he.” – 1 Samuel 16:11, 12

Readings

1 Samuel 16:1-13 · John 10:1-18 · Psalm 48

Sermon

David is, perhaps, the most striking figure in Old Testament history. He was Israel’s greatest warrior and greatest poet. Starting as a shepherd keeping guard over his father’s flock in the pastures about Bethlehem, he rose to become king over the twelve tribes, completely subduing all of Israel’s enemies, and making Jerusalem the capital of the nation. And through him the Psalms were given, which have ever since his day formed the principal vehicle of praise and thanksgiving, not only for Israel, but for the Christian Church as well.

Because of his victories over the enemies of Israel he represents the Lord, and the Lord is called “the son of David.” David, therefore, even to those who have no knowledge of correspondences, represents the Lord, and for this reason his life is of interest to all Christians.

We must not, however, confound the character of David as a man with that of David as a representative of the Lord. The only example for Christians to follow is the Lord Jesus Christ. We are to follow Him, and Him alone. He is the vine; we are the branches. We derive our life from Him, and without Him we can do nothing.

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