“See, thy son liveth,” by Louis A. Dole

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Fryeburg, Maine, December 6, 1931

“See, thy son liveth.” – 1 Kings 17:23

Readings

1 Kings 17 · John 12:23-50 · Psalm 86

Sermon

The story containing our text is most tender and appealing. Death had taken the son of a poor widow. She and her son had been carried through the three year famine by the meal and oil that wasted not, because Elijah, the man of God, had found shelter in her house. Then came affliction sorer than the famine. Her son, in whom lived her hope as a mother in Israel, died in her arms.

To get the vital lesson in this narrative we must see it in its relation to the events immediately preceding, for the striking chapter of the text by three wonderful miracles there told describes three successive states of a regenerating man. The third state is pictured in the raising to life of the dead son of the widow.

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Eulogy for Arthur N. Lawrence, August 17, 1963, by Louis A. Dole

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Arthur N. Lawrence
Lisbon Falls, Aug. 17, 1963

“Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life.” – Revelation 2:10

It is hard to conceive of a theme which comes closer to our hearts or makes us think more deeply than that which is concerned with the end of our career in this world and our entrance into the eternal world, in which all who are prepared become eternally happy.

Without a knowledge of the Lord and of His Divine providence over us, as revealed in the Sacred Scriptures, life here cannot be understood.

The first thing that the Bible tells us is that in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth and finally man in the image and likeness of his Creator. Then man was commanded to be fruitful and multiply and replenish the earth.

It is a beautiful world that has been created for us, a world that is able to satisfy our every physical need and desire if we but seek to understand and master it. In symbolic language God tells us, “And the Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it,” and “Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet.” These words beautifully describe the real situation. We are God’s tenants and caretakers here. We are to subdue the earth, to dress it and to keep it. We are to study it, to enjoy it, and to make the best use we can of it. It is a wonderful task and God has endowed mankind with the capacities which will enable him to carry out His commands.

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“And I give unto them eternal life,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And I give unto them eternal life.” – John 10:28

Readings

Daniel 12 · Matthew 28 · Psalm 30

Sermon

The Lord’s life, death, and resurrection, as recorded in the Gospels, were not only significant in their literal bearing, but they were outward revelations of great spiritual facts which are realized in all who follow Him in the regeneration. The life that the Lord came to make manifest to men is a superlatively desirable life, a life filled with happiness from Him, which endures forever and which has its beginnings now and here, as we follow Him. The life that He lived in the world as the Word made flesh was the symbol of the life that He now lives in the mind that opens itself to receive Him. As we learn and keep His precepts the literal history of the Lord’s life becomes, in course of time, transformed into a spiritual history written on the pages of the soul’s book of life.

There was a time in the long ago Golden Age of the world when the Lord spoke to the inner consciousness of men by an interior revelation of Himself to the mind; but when the glory of that period came to an end through man’s turning to the love of self and the world, He revealed to men His Word in a written form, and finally as this same Word He assumed a natural humanity, that He might reach men through a visible manifestation of Himself to their sight. So He lived before men the life that was within the written Word, which was with God and which was God, glorified with the glory which it had with the Father before the world was.

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“Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures?” by Louis A. Dole

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“And they said one to another, Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures?” – Luke 24:32

Readings

Isaiah 60:1-5, 17-22 · Luke 24:23-35 · Psalm 96

Sermon

The joys and sorrows of this life – even of this life at its best – can scarcely sustain us in equanimity. We celebrate the Resurrection because it makes known to us the great fact of the immortality of the soul, giving to us the inspiration and joy of final victory over all that stands in the way of our happiness, and of the all-satisfying life of heaven.

The Resurrection is the most far-reaching fact of history, and in the light of it all of our life here should be lived. It is a great historical truth that once darkness covered the earth and gross darkness the people, and that those who walked in darkness saw a great light, and that to them that dwelt in the region and shadow of death a great light burst forth. Thereafter the world was never the same.

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“He is not here: for he is risen, as he said,” by Louis A. Dole

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“He is not here: for he is risen, as he said.” – Matthew 28:6

Readings

Isaiah 61 · Matthew 28:1-10 · Psalm 99

Sermon

The whole Christian world rejoices with us in the celebration of Easter. The coming of spring inspires mankind with new hopes. It is the time of nature’s resurrection from the sleep of winter, and is a symbol of what may take place in the soul.

The Lord’s life, death, and resurrection, as recorded in the Gospels, were not only significant in their literal bearing but they were outward revelations of great spiritual facts which are realized in all who follow Him in the regeneration. The life that He lived in the world as the Word made flesh is the symbol of the life which He now lives in the soul that opens itself to receive Him.

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“I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly,” by Louis A. Dole

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“I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.” – John 10:10

Readings

Ezekiel 37:1-10 · Matthew 28 · Psalm 115

Sermon

The story of Easter is one of triumph. The Lord had told His disciples that He would be put to death, and that He would rise on the third day. He laid down His life in such a way that no one could doubt His death. He was publicly executed. A spear was thrust into His side. The examiners pronounced Him dead. He was put into a tomb which was then sealed with a great stone, and a soldier guard was stationed at the tomb. Even His disciples, who had been instructed as to what would come to pass, were dismayed and thought that the cause they had been espousing was lost.

But the Resurrection marked the final triumph of the Lord’s victorious life, the casting off of the last hindrance to the fullness of the Divine presence among men, the completing of the Divine Humanity, the temple of God which He had been building, insuring His eternal presence on earth as in heaven with fullness of saving power.

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“And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish.” – John 10:28

Readings

Isaiah 63 · Luke 24:1-27 · Psalms 122, 123

Sermon

There is but one subject for today – the Resurrection. It is delightful to us that we celebrate Easter in the spring of the year, when all life is rising again from the sleep of winter. Everyone feels within himself new gladness and new hope in the warmth of the returning sun and the renewal of earth’s life. But this new life which we see bursting into leaf and blossom is still but earthly and physical life. This resurrection of the earth in spring is the symbol – not the reality.

When the Lord said, “Whither I go ye know, and the way ye know,” He was speaking of His death and resurrection. He went to prepare a place for us in heaven, and the way is by His Word, which teaches of Him and shows us that where His presence is there is heaven.

Nor is man’s mere resurrection from the grave the reality of which the Lord spoke when He said, “I give unto them eternal life.” All men have risen from the grave. The life of man is indestructible and always has been so. There is no man who ever lived who does not live now. We cannot die in the sense that we cease to live. The Lord was not speaking of bodily life when He said, “I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die.”

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“Why seek ye the living among the dead?” by Louis A. Dole

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“Why seek ye the living among the dead?” – Luke 24:5

Readings

Isaiah 61 · Matthew 28:1-8 · Psalm 57

Sermon

The scene of the crucifixion was over. The Lord’s life in the flesh had come to its end, and His body had been placed in the tomb. This took place on a Friday. Early Sunday morning Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and other women came to the sepulchre bringing spices for the final preparation of the body. They could not do this on Saturday because of Jewish customs. When they came to the sepulchre, they found the stone which had closed the tomb rolled away. The body of Jesus was not there. It was then that the two angels in shining garments greeted them with the words of the text, “Why seek ye the living among the dead?”

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