“But the court which is without the temple leave out, and measure it not; for it is given unto the Gentiles,” by Louis A. Dole

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“But the court which is without the temple leave out, and measure it not; for it is given unto the Gentiles: and the holy city shall they tread under foot forty and two months.” – Revelation 11:2

Readings

Jeremiah 31:31-40 · Revelation 11 · Psalm 52

Sermon

The Tabernacle was built according to the pattern showed to Moses on the mount. It was the center of Jewish worship. All the tribes had their position in relation to it. Covered by the pillar of cloud by day and by the pillar of fire by night, it was the visible sign of the presence and protection of the Almighty.

The Tabernacle, made from the costliest offerings of all the people and built by hands inspired by God to do the delicate work, had a beauty and glory beyond anything man himself could conceive. Whether it is realized or not, man is ever a worshiper and from earliest times has found delight in adorning his temples and making them works of beauty. But the Tabernacle, as well as the Temple and modern churches whose basic structure is that of the Tabernacle, has a beauty beyond that of mere outward form.

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“Then will I go unto the altar of God, unto God my exceeding joy,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Then will I go unto the altar of God, unto God my exceeding joy.” – Psalm 93:4

Readings

Exodus 30:1-10 · Revelation 8 · Psalm 138

Sermon

Altars are mentioned many times throughout the Word. It is recorded that Noah built an altar unto the Lord, Abraham built an altar, Moses built an altar, Joshua, Balaam, Elijah, Gideon, and David built altars. Altars are mentioned also in the Gospels and in Revelation.

An altar is a symbol of Divine worship in general. In the tabernacle there was the golden altar of incense in the Holy Place and there was the great brazen altar in the outer court. Likewise in the temple built by Solomon there were the golden altar and the brazen altar.

We read in the writings that “Altars were made of soil, of stones, of brass, of wood, and also of gold; of brass, wood, and gold because these signified good” (A.C. 8940e).

From most ancient times men built altars for worship. The altar of stone represents worship from truth. The stones were to be used just as they were found in nature, to represent the fact that truths as found in the Word are from the Lord and that they must not be changed or altered to fit the desires of men.

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“First be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift,” by Louis A. Dole

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“If thou bring thy gift to the altar, and there rememberest that thy brother hath ought against thee;
“Leave there thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift.” – Matthew 5:23, 24

Readings

1 Kings 18:17-39 · Matthew 5:17-26 · Psalms 12, 13, 14

Sermon

These words from the Sermon on the Mount are very familiar to us. In their obvious meaning they teach us the futility of expecting a blessing from our heavenly Father if we are unwilling to show brotherly good will to others. There are requirements connected with giving.

In its letter the text refers to the offerings brought by Israel to the great altar in the temple court, the animals, birds, and fruits of the harvest. And in the detailed Levitical laws concerning these offerings it is made clear that it is not man who confers a favor upon God by his offerings; it is man who is blessed by God if his offerings are accepted. Therefore if man is to be blessed, he must give as God requires. And the first requirement of worthy giving, the Lord tells us, is that a man be reconciled to his brother. Prayers, church-going, contributions toward religion, ceremonies, the reciting of creeds have no honor to the Lord in them unless one does good in his daily life.

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