“See, thy son liveth,” by Louis A. Dole

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Fryeburg, Maine, December 6, 1931

“See, thy son liveth.” – 1 Kings 17:23

Readings

1 Kings 17 · John 12:23-50 · Psalm 86

Sermon

The story containing our text is most tender and appealing. Death had taken the son of a poor widow. She and her son had been carried through the three year famine by the meal and oil that wasted not, because Elijah, the man of God, had found shelter in her house. Then came affliction sorer than the famine. Her son, in whom lived her hope as a mother in Israel, died in her arms.

To get the vital lesson in this narrative we must see it in its relation to the events immediately preceding, for the striking chapter of the text by three wonderful miracles there told describes three successive states of a regenerating man. The third state is pictured in the raising to life of the dead son of the widow.

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“And was transfigured before them: and his face did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as the light,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart,
“And was transfigured before them: and his face did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as the light.
“And, behold, there appeared unto them Moses and Elias talking with him.” – Matthew 17:1-3

Readings

Isaiah 6 · Matthew 17:1-13 · Psalm 97

Sermon

The Transfiguration is a picture of the Lord as He is in His glorified Humanity. The Lord took Peter, James, and John up into a high mountain apart from the others, and He was transfigured before them. His face shone as the sun, His raiment was white as the light, Moses and Elijah were with Him, a bright cloud overshadowed them, and a voice was heard from the cloud saying, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye him.” And when they had come down from the mountain, the Lord said to them, “Tell the vision to no man, until the Son of man be risen again from the dead.”

In order that they might witness His Transfiguration the Lord raised His three closest disciples out of their ordinary states into the high mountain of spiritual perception. He drew aside the veil of the senses, and gave them a glimpse of His glory as they would see Him in the after life, that they and men of all time might have some true idea of His real nature.

Many years later the Lord appeared to John in vision as described in the opening chapter of the Book of Revelation.

The Transfiguration has a lesson for us. It is the example and pattern of the change which takes place in us by our regeneration. It shows what we may remotely, finitely become compared with our state at present, for by regeneration we become formed into His image and likeness.

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“And he repaired the altar of the Lord that was broken down,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And he repaired the altar of the Lord that was broken down.” – 1 Kings 18:30

Readings

1 Kings 18:17-30 · Luke 10:25-42 · Psalm 84

Sermon

All religion centers on the belief in God. However varied the concepts of God have been in the course of the ages with the different peoples, however coarse and obscure the ideas of His will and requirements have been, yet from the beginning religion has consisted of the recognition of an almighty God and the learning and fulfillment of His Divine will, as it was understood at different times. People sometimes use the word “religion” to apply to any theory of conduct which they have chosen to adopt; they say, “That is my religion.” It is true that the word itself means a “binding back,” and that we may be bound back from doing many things we want to do by worldly considerations of various kinds, but such a binding back does not change the heart – in fact, it is more than likely to create in the heart self-conceit and the pride of self-intelligence. Though in the preceding epochs and eras the Lord could not reveal Himself in the fullness of His Divine Humanity, though for a long period of time the external state of mankind made it necessary to have worship clothed with the veil of external forms which were not even understood, yet religion has always been the inmost of man and has always served as the means by which the Lord could guide His children to His heavenly kingdom, and there has been at all times a “secret place of the Most High” in man’s soul where the altar of the Lord could be erected.

The altar of the Lord is the symbol of our acknowledgment of the Lord in the heart and life, setting up the law of the Lord as the supreme law of all our thoughts and actions.

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“And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and bread and flesh in the evening; and he drank of the brook.
“And it came to pass after a while, that the brook dried up, because there had been no rain in the land.” – 1 Kings 17:6-7

Readings

1 Kings 17:1-16 · John 6:27-45 · Psalm 147

Sermon

There was a famine in Canaan. The Lord told Elijah, the man of God, to go down to the brook Cherith, east of the Jordan, where he could drink of the brook, and the ravens would bring him food. There he remained until the brook dried up from lack of rain.

In its letter this story is a picture of the Lord’s care for one who looks to Him seeking to do His will, making all things from the water of the earth to the birds of the air serve him. It seems a strange way of caring for Elijah, but the Lord does care for us in many unexpected and strange ways. This is one of the miracles that the Lord wrought. Skeptics have questioned it, as they have questioned all the miracles of the Word, but this miracle testifies to the power of the Lord to serve mankind in unsuspected ways.

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