“And the glory which thou gavest me I have given them; that they may be one, even as we are one,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity! – Psalm 133:1

“And the glory which thou gavest me I have given them; that they may be one, even as we are one.” – John 17:22

Readings

2 Samuel 7:18-29 · John 17:1, 12-26 · Psalm 132

Sermon

These verses express the purpose of the Lord’s creation of men and also of His coming into the world. By nature we like to associate with others and to be united with them in mutual service. The most dreaded punishment is solitary confinement. If long continued, it leads to madness and to self-destruction. All happiness results from the association of one conscious being with another and with those external objects which call the various faculties of the mind into harmonious action.

The material body was made to respond to and to act in harmony with the laws of the world of nature. When these laws are violated, the body is weakened and invaded by disease. All our domestic and social pleasures come from union with one another in the various forms of social life. So it is with marriage and family life. This law governs all human relations. If men and women should be isolated from all union with the outward world and with one another, happiness would be impossible to them. The happiness of heaven consists in the union of its members with each other in mutual service. And as all happiness has its source in the Lord, the first essential of all is conjunction with the Lord – “I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one.”

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The Divine Providence, by Louis A. Dole

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“But the very hairs of your head are all numbered.” – Matthew 10:30

Readings

1 Samuel 14:33-46 · Matthew 10:16-31 · Psalm 40

Sermon

In these words the Lord teaches us that His providence embraces all things down to the very least and minutest particulars.

Our text follows the admonition, “And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.” The power of men extends only to the body. To show them how little cause they had to fear men, the Lord calls the attention of His disciples to the providence that is ever over them and which enters into the smallest particulars of their lives. “Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall to the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered.”

Numbering denotes arrangement. The argument then is: if the Lord’s providential care extends to the least things in life, how much more to the greatest, if to the least individual, how much more to the government of nations and to the church which is His kingdom in the world? If the Lord provides for the sparrow, which is of so little worth, we have no cause for fear, for we are of more value than many sparrows.

These words of our Lord give us the light of hope in the night of trial and adversity, and give us strength and courage to meet all dangers and trials with full confidence for the future, whatever the appearance may be to us.

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“Behold, I come quickly; and my reward is with me, to give every man according as his work shall be,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Behold, I come quickly; and my reward is with me, to give every man according as his work shall be.” – Revelation 22:12

Readings

1 Kings 10:1-9 · Revelation 22:1-14 · Psalm 145

Sermon

Life is short. These words express a very common point of view, particularly with those who believe that there is no life beyond the grave. But to those who do believe in eternal life these words also apply, for in comparison to eternity any length of life on this earth is short. Human life is not long or short absolutety. It seems short to us because we are actually immortal, and deep down within us there is a consciousness of this fact.

And we know that any life that is active and full of accomplishment seems short. An inactive, empty life, however short, will seem long. To the busy man time flies. Time hangs heavy on the man who has nothing to do.

It is to our glory if life seems short to us. If there are many things we want to do, if we see that there is much that we should accomplish in ourselves, the longest life will seem short.

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“Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage.” Psalm 119:54

Readings

Deuteronomy 30:1-10 · John 15:1-16 · Psalm 119:33-56

Sermon

The one hundred and nineteenth Psalm, from which this text is taken, is in every verse a song or hymn in praise of the Law of the Lord. It is evident that multitudes of men and women have toward God’s Law a very different attitude from this. Divine Law, obligation to God, responsibility in any form, authority under any conditions they feel to be a hindrance and check upon life. They want their own will and way. Why should they be held back in any of their pleasures or checked in following their strongest impulses? If only they could be free, life, they think, would be a comparatively easy and fair existence.

In the text “Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage” the Psalmist is expressing in figurative language the teaching that the Law of the Lord is really a delight throughout the course of life. The thought that obedience to Divine Law is hard and restrictive, that it cuts one off from the real pleasures of life and makes our pilgrimage here dry and barren is quite contrary to fact. The Psalmist is right.

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