“And that servant, which knew his lord’s will, and prepared not himself, neither did according to his will, shall be beaten with many stripes,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And that servant, which knew his lord’s will, and prepared not himself, neither did according to his will, shall be beaten with many stripes.
“But he that knew not, and did commit things worthy of stripes, shall be beaten with few stripes. For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required: and to whom men have committed much, of him they will ask the more.” – Luke 12:47, 48

Readings

Leviticus 5:14-6:7 · Luke 12:31-48 · Psalm 143

Sermon

In these words the Lord teaches us the nature and measure of our responsibility to Him and to our fellow men. All the precepts of the Word are of universal application. The Lord does not ask us to do more than we can – to act with a wisdom which we do not possess, or to do things beyond our ability and strength. But while the Lord demands no more than we can give, He also asks no less. Those who know the Lord’s will and do it not will be beaten with many stripes. Those who sin ignorantly will be beaten with few stripes. If we violate the laws of nature, whether wilfully or in ignorance, we must pay the penalty which is the necessary effect of a law.

In the Scriptures the Lord is said to punish, but this is according to appearances. The Lord is love; His only desire is to bless. His constant effort is to heal men of their afflictions and diseases. But this can be done only as evils and falsities are removed, and this requires man’s cooperation. Knowledge of this should give us comfort if we are living in the light of it, and should inspire us to greater fidelity if we are not.

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“My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge,” by Louis A. Dole

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“My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge.” – Hosea 4:6

Readings

Genesis 4:1-15 · John 6:53-69 · Psalm 119:1-16

Sermon

In the church calendar this week is noted as “Education Week.” To the modern mind education means the acquisition of knowledges concerning the world and the development of human life upon it, and also preparation for one’s trade or profession. So we have our histories, and studies in the sciences and manual arts, in philosophy, psychology, and the humanities. Yet there is one Book which has had more influence in forming, directing, and determining human life than all other books combined which is often passed over today. This Book is, of course, the Word.

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“Lead me in thy truth, and teach me: for thou art the God of my salvation,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Lead me in thy truth, and teach me: for thou art the God of my salvation.” – Psalm 25:5

Readings

Isaiah 31 · Mark 12:1-18 · Psalm 25

Sermon

Of all God’s creatures on earth man alone is interested in truth. Other creatures live their day, impelled by their animal instincts, reacting mechanically upon their environment. But from the dawn of history man has pondered upon and tried to understand this marvelous universe in which he finds himself placed, and his own relation to it.

Man’s knowledge of the universe grew slowly from age to age, but in recent generations it has grown by leaps and bounds. The results of scientific research on the material plane have been so extensive and so positive that the claim is made that through it can be found the answers to all our problems. Sometimes it oversteps its boundaries and speculates about things which are above the material plane – with disastrous results. Theology is one of these realms. Natural science knows nothing of God, of the sanctity of the Word, of redemption, of faith, of free will, of repentance, of the remission of sins, of heaven and hell, of the state of man after death, of salvation and eternal life, or of baptism and the Holy Supper.

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