“The secret things belong unto the Lord our God: but those things which are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever,” by Louis A. Dole

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“The secret things belong unto the Lord our God: but those things which are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever, that we may do all the words of this law.” – Deuteronomy 29:29

Readings

Deuteronomy 29:10-29 · Luke 14:1-14 · Psalm 14

Sermon

The course of history is determined by the ideas which men hold and carry out into life. There are various systems of thought seeking control in the world. Socialism, Communism, Pacifism, and so on, together with the various religions, are such systems of thought. Each claims to seek the common welfare. With the exception of the religions, however, none look to a power outside of man himself.

We cannot get along without knowledge. We need to know the nature of the world and the meaning of life. And if we are to be inwardly at peace, our thoughts must be harmonious. There are conflicts in ourselves, as well as in the world in which we live. The forces which have divided men are at work in us, and unless we can subordinate them to some unifying principle, they will work havoc in our lives.

This need has existed from the beginning and the Lord has provided for it. He has progressively revealed His Word as men were able to receive it. While this revelation was yet in progress, many things were but partially made known which afterwards were more plainly revealed. Revelation has been sufficient to meet the needs of every age.

While the great event of the Lord’s incarnation and the light which it shed into the world were yet in the future, Moses could not be seen without the veil upon his face, nor could the later prophets be perceived more clearly, since upon the glory of revealed truth the Lord had placed a covering, This obscurity is not confined to the Old Testament, but extends also to the New. What is revealed in the Gospels and in the Apocalypse respecting the future states of the first Christian Church and the Second Coming of the Lord has been as little understood by Christians as the predictions of Moses and the prophets were by the Jews, and it can now be clearly discerned only because the events predicted have taken place and the meaning of the prophecies has been disclosed. These things, with the spiritual sense of the Word whose opening accompanied and reveals the Second Coming of the Lord, are secrets of revelation itself, which time discloses. There are, however, secrets which have no place in revelation.

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“For had ye believed Moses, ye would have believed me: for he wrote of me,” by Louis A. Dole

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“For had ye believed Moses, ye would have believed me: for he wrote of me.
“But if ye believe not his writings, how shall ye believe my words?” – John 5:46, 47

Readings

Deuteronomy 32:1-14 · John 5:24-47 · Psalm 73

Sermon

The second Sunday in December is widely celebrated throughout the Christian world as “Bible Sunday.”

The Gospel of John opens with the words, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God,” and it is further declared that “the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us.” The Lord who is the Word, whose very life is the life of the Word came to manifest Himself to us. So He declares, “Had ye believed Moses, ye would have believed me: for he wrote of me. But if ye believe not his writings, how shall ye believe my words?” Thus the Old and the New Testaments are made interdependent.

The burden of the Old Testament is the teaching that God the Lord would come into the world as its Redeemer and Savior. If men do not believe the prophecy, how can they believe the fulfillment?

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“Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you, and ordained you, that ye should go and bring forth fruit, and that your fruit should remain.” – John 15:16

Readings

Haggai 1 · John 15:1-17 · Psalm 132

Sermon

These words the Lord spoke to His disciples in the upper room at Jerusalem at the close of the Last Supper. “Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you.” Perhaps they thought that they had chosen Him. They had given up their former occupations and all hope of worldly success and even of security. They had forsaken houses, and brethren, and sisters, and father and mother, and wife and children, and lands for His name’s sake. In one sense they had chosen Him. And in this sense we must choose Him, too. We must willingly respond to His invitation, “Follow me.” He does not compel us.

Why then does He say, “Ye have not chosen me?” Toward the end of the last week of the Lord’s earthly life people had turned against Him. The atmosphere of the city was tense and hostile to Him and to His followers. Perhaps they had begun to waver, and to wonder if they had not made a mistake. In reality, however, they had not chosen Him. The initiative had been His. If He had not called them, they never would have chosen Him. He chose them first. And in a deeper sense, their own selfhood had not chosen Him. The part of them that had chosen Him was the part which they had received from Him in childhood. Only the Lord’s goodness within a man can respond to His pleading from without. Man simply cannot choose the Lord; the Lord chooses man.

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