“Not unto us, O Lord, not unto us, but unto thy name give glory,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Not unto us, O Lord, not unto us, but unto thy name give glory, for thy mercy, and for thy truth’s sake.” – Psalm 115:1

Readings

Leviticus 26:1-13 · John 15:1-16 · Psalm 104:24-35

Sermon

The first harvest which the New England colonists reaped upon our shores was made the occasion of special thanksgiving and prayer to God. The importance of this first harvest, which meant that the colonists had gained a foothold in the new land, increased as its significance became better understood until, under President Lincoln in 1863, it was made a permanent national celebration.

From a very small beginning we have grown to become the richest and most powerful nation that the world has ever seen. The harvest is from the Lord’s hand. So today we celebrate that first harvest in recognition of the Lord as God over the destiny of nations as well as of individuals.

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“Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless his holy name,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless his holy name.
“Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits.” – Psalm 103:1-2

Readings

Haggai 2:1-9, 20-23 · Revelation 14:1-7 · Psalm 103

Sermon

In the Word we find numerous and beautiful references to the value of thanksgiving, of the acknowledgment and confession of the Lord’s goodness, and of the mercies which He bestows: thanksgiving for spiritual blessings. “I thank thee, and praise thee, O thou God of my fathers, who hast given me wisdom and might, and hast made known unto me now what we desired of thee.”

There are thanksgivings for the coming of the Lord and the establishment and growth of His kingdom, and thanksgivings for His presence with us, enlightening us to see the way of life and delivering us from spiritual bondage. So the Psalmist writes, “I will offer unto thee the sacrifices of thanksgiving.”

The Lord commissioned His apostles saying, “Go ye into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature.” The word translated creature here means every created thing. The Lord could give this command because He is the Creator and Sustainer of all things, and could say “All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth.” We recall that the Lord by His miracles, the turning of the water into wine, the stilling of the storm, the healing of all manner of sicknesses, showed that He had this power.

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“O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever,” by Louis A. Dole

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“O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever.” – Psalm 136:1

Readings

Isaiah 51:1-11 · Luke 18:9-22 · Psalm 136

Sermon

Many times in the Scriptures we are told to give thanks to God. This is because thanksgiving is meaningless without God, and the observance of Thanksgiving Day futile save in connection with the acknowledgment of our debts to Him.

There is no one who has not many things for which to be thankful. Gratitude is one of the virtues and is possible on all planes of life. From the lowest to the highest all can give thanks. The natural man can give thanks for blessings received. He is grateful for the good things of life. He gives thanks to God for his food and clothing and for worldly success. And this is proper. How much better it is that one should thus recognize his Heavenly Father in these things than that with indifference to their source he should partake of the material blessings of life, appropriating to his own use whatever appeals to his appetites without a thought beyond their gratification! It is good for him to give thanks for his blessings, for it leads him to look outside of himself, and to recognize and love the source of his blessings.

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