“See, thy son liveth,” by Louis A. Dole

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Fryeburg, Maine, December 6, 1931

“See, thy son liveth.” – 1 Kings 17:23

Readings

1 Kings 17 · John 12:23-50 · Psalm 86

Sermon

The story containing our text is most tender and appealing. Death had taken the son of a poor widow. She and her son had been carried through the three year famine by the meal and oil that wasted not, because Elijah, the man of God, had found shelter in her house. Then came affliction sorer than the famine. Her son, in whom lived her hope as a mother in Israel, died in her arms.

To get the vital lesson in this narrative we must see it in its relation to the events immediately preceding, for the striking chapter of the text by three wonderful miracles there told describes three successive states of a regenerating man. The third state is pictured in the raising to life of the dead son of the widow.

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“And I give unto them eternal life,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And I give unto them eternal life.” – John 10:28

Readings

Daniel 12 · Matthew 28 · Psalm 30

Sermon

The Lord’s life, death, and resurrection, as recorded in the Gospels, were not only significant in their literal bearing, but they were outward revelations of great spiritual facts which are realized in all who follow Him in the regeneration. The life that the Lord came to make manifest to men is a superlatively desirable life, a life filled with happiness from Him, which endures forever and which has its beginnings now and here, as we follow Him. The life that He lived in the world as the Word made flesh was the symbol of the life that He now lives in the mind that opens itself to receive Him. As we learn and keep His precepts the literal history of the Lord’s life becomes, in course of time, transformed into a spiritual history written on the pages of the soul’s book of life.

There was a time in the long ago Golden Age of the world when the Lord spoke to the inner consciousness of men by an interior revelation of Himself to the mind; but when the glory of that period came to an end through man’s turning to the love of self and the world, He revealed to men His Word in a written form, and finally as this same Word He assumed a natural humanity, that He might reach men through a visible manifestation of Himself to their sight. So He lived before men the life that was within the written Word, which was with God and which was God, glorified with the glory which it had with the Father before the world was.

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“And of Zion it shall be said, This and that man was born in her,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And of Zion it shall be said, This and that man was born in her: and the highest himself shall establish her.
“The Lord shall count, when he writeth up the people, that this man was born there.” – Psalm 87:5, 6

Readings

Isaiah 2:1-11 · Matthew 7:15-29 · Psalm 84

Sermon

The eighty-seventh Psalm, from which our text is taken, is a song of praise to the Lord for His church. In Zechariah we read, “I am returned unto Zion, and will dwell in the midst of Jerusalem: and Jerusalem shall be called a city of truth; and the mountain of the Lord of hosts the holy mountain.” Here Jerusalem is the city of truth and Zion the holy mountain. Zion represents a state of love and those in whom love to the Lord reigns. So the Psalmist writes, “Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised in the city of our God, in the mountain of his holiness. Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth, is mount Zion,” and again, “Walk about Zion, and go round about her: tell the towers thereof. Mark ye well her bulwarks, consider her palaces; that ye may tell it to the generation following. For this God is our God for ever and ever: he will be our guide even unto death.” It is not the material city and mountain that are here meant. Again, the angels of heaven were seen in vision by John on Mount Zion: “And I looked, and, lo, a Lamb stood on the mount Sion, and with him an hundred and forty and four thousand, having his Father’s name written in their foreheads.” The Father is the Lord as to His Divine love, and His name written on the forehead is His truth inscribed in the will. Zion was the highest part of Jerusalem; so our Psalm continues with the words, “The Lord loveth the gates of Zion more than all the dwellings of Jacob.” The gates of Zion are the truths which lead men to states of love. These are precious in the Lord’s sight, more than all the speculations of science or any other knowledge. For without the possession of heavenly love, no other grace is truly valuable. Love is the fulfilling of the law; it disposes the heart to believe and rejoice in the truth.

The Zion, then, whose gates the Lord loves, and of which it shall be said, when He counts up His people, “This man was born there,” is no material city, but a state of life. We naturally have an affection for the place where we were born, where our childhood days were spent. But as the Lord is no respecter of persons, He will certainly be no respecter of cities, or of any one place over another on His beautiful earth. The place of one’s natural birth does not confer any special benefit. A good man is a good man wherever he may have been born.

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“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth,” by Louis A. Dole

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“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” – Genesis 1:1

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” – John 1:1

Readings

Genesis 1:1-13 · John 1:1-14 · Psalm 84

Sermon

No one who has observed the tendency of the popular literature of today and its influence on the public mind can have failed to note the widespread doubt that everywhere prevails as to the inspiration of the Scriptures.

Particularly the opening chapters of Genesis have been the cause of many controversies in the church and in the world. As soon as the natural sciences began to be developed, the opening chapters of the Bible came into question, as the rational man cannot reject the demonstrated facts of science. To meet this new advance in human development the Lord made His Second Coming in revealing the inner meaning of the Word. This was a final Divine revelation of spiritual truth essential to this new age.

The first eleven chapters of Genesis are a Divine allegory, and only as such can they be understood. In fact all of the inspired books of the Bible have a spiritual meaning within the letter. Heaven and earth are used in the Bible as symbols – heaven as the symbol of the spiritual mind and earth as the symbol of the natural mind. Regeneration, which is the subject treated of in the story of creation, is the orderly formation and development of the distinct planes of life that are involved in the structure of the two minds. The spiritual mind is formed of three distinct degrees, the celestial, the spiritual, and the natural. The natural mind is also constituted of three degrees, the rational, the scientific, and the sensual. These two minds, with their degrees of life, constitute the difference between man and the mere animal, for the mere animal possesses only the sensual degree, with something that makes an approach to the scientific, and is wholly without the rational and the three degrees constituent of the spiritual mind.

That is why it is said, “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” Regeneration is the opening of the spiritual mind, by which the natural mind is reformed and brought into order.

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