“These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy might remain in you, and that your joy might be full,” by Louis A. Dole

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“These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy might remain in you, and that your joy might be full.” – John 15:11

Readings

Zephaniah 3:8-20 · John 15:1-14 · Psalm 16

Sermon

The Lord came into the world to overcome evil and to teach men the way of life that leads to peace and happiness. During His life in the world the Lord underwent temptations, severe and desperate temptations; yet these were entered into from His love for the human race. Through all was the inward joy which comes from the love which prompted Him. For it is love, in its various forms of affection, desire, interest, zeal, that prompts all activity.

The outward life of the Lord as described in the Gospels is in the main one of quiet peacefulness and fruitfulness. This is because in Him were no selfish desires or personal aims. No desire for wealth or for position among men was ever permitted to influence His feeling. Offered by the devil all the kingdoms of the world, He put them aside and chose to be one of the lowly.

He underwent the severest conflict with the evils of mankind, as the closing scenes of His life bear witness and as other portions of the Scriptures testify. He was “a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief.” Yet in His own view His life was especially distinguished from the life of all others by its peace and joy. “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you,” He said. “These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy might remain in you, and that your joy might be full.” All happiness and peace are from within, and His joy was from doing the works of love.

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“Make thee two trumpets of silver… that thou mayest use them for the calling of the assembly, and for the journeying of the camps,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Make thee two trumpets of silver; of a whole piece shalt thou make them: that thou mayest use them for the calling of the assembly, and for the journeying of the camps.” – Numbers 10:2

Readings

Numbers 10:1-13 · Revelation 4 · Psalms 98, 99, 100

Sermon

This is one of many laws given through Moses at Sinai which were abrogated as to their literal observance when the Lord came into the world. But being a part of the Word they have a meaning for today and for all future ages.

When the commandments were given at Sinai, there was the voice of the trumpet exceeding loud, signifying that a revelation from the Lord was being given.

Our text speaks of two trumpets made of silver. If both were blown at the same time the people were to assemble before the tabernacle. If but one trumpet was blown, the princes and heads of Israel were to assemble. When an alarm was sounded, the camps on the east were to take up their journey, and at the second sounding the camps on the south. Before going to war they were to blow an alarm on the trumpets, and also on the days of their rejoicings, on their solemn days, and in the beginning of their months.

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“Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage.” Psalm 119:54

Readings

Deuteronomy 30:1-10 · John 15:1-16 · Psalm 119:33-56

Sermon

The one hundred and nineteenth Psalm, from which this text is taken, is in every verse a song or hymn in praise of the Law of the Lord. It is evident that multitudes of men and women have toward God’s Law a very different attitude from this. Divine Law, obligation to God, responsibility in any form, authority under any conditions they feel to be a hindrance and check upon life. They want their own will and way. Why should they be held back in any of their pleasures or checked in following their strongest impulses? If only they could be free, life, they think, would be a comparatively easy and fair existence.

In the text “Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage” the Psalmist is expressing in figurative language the teaching that the Law of the Lord is really a delight throughout the course of life. The thought that obedience to Divine Law is hard and restrictive, that it cuts one off from the real pleasures of life and makes our pilgrimage here dry and barren is quite contrary to fact. The Psalmist is right.

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