“Man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord doth man live,” by Louis A. Dole

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“Man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord doth man live.” – Deuteronomy 8:3

Readings

Deuteronomy 8:1-10 · Luke 4:1-14 · Psalm 78:1-11

Sermon

Joshua and his hosts are standing on the banks of the Jordan about to cross over into the Promised Land. It is expedient that they be counseled in regard to the promises of the Lord. The forty years’ struggle in the wilderness is ended. They are about to cross the Jordan and find their permanent homes. But their possession of the land is conditioned. They must worship the Lord and keep the commandments. So the lesson of the wilderness is enforced by rehearsal.

Forty years have they dwelt among those arid hills, a scanty vegetation beneath their feet, a cloudless sky and burning sun above. How in this wilderness could such a multitude exist? Only by miraculous power from on high. Only by the wise providence of their God, Jehovah. Only by the manna which descended from the heavens. Throughout their forty years in the wilderness they were miraculously fed by the hand of God. What a lesson this should have been them! Sustained not once nor only occasionally, not for a month or a year, not one man or family, but a whole nation sustained by a supernatural power for forty years!

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“And it came to pass, when Pharaoh had let the people go, that God led them not through the way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near,” by Louis A. Dole

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“And it came to pass, when Pharaoh had let the people go, that God led them not through the way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near; for God said, Lest peradventure the people repent when they see war, and they return to Egypt.” – Exodus 13:17

Readings

Exodus 13:14-22 · Matthew 26:31-46 · Psalm 62

Sermon

The distance from northern Egypt, where the Israelites had been dwelling, to Jerusalem, which was to be their future capital, was about two hundred miles by the direct route, whereas the distance by the route they actually traversed was not less than four times as great. The way by the seacoast, which led through the land of the Philistines, was near, but the way through the desert was far; and not only was it far but it was through almost foodless and waterless country. Yet the Lord led the Israelites by that long and difficult way.

The Christian Church has long recognized that the journey from Egypt to Canaan is a type of our preparation for heaven. They think of Egypt as picturing the state of life into which we are born, the love of sensual, selfish, and worldly things; the journey in the wilderness has been dimly seen to be the type of trials which are met with, the crossing of the Jordan the passage from the natural to the spiritual, and the entrance into Canaan the reward and rest of heaven. There is much that is true and helpful in this interpretation, but it overlooks the fact that some of Israel’s hardest battles were fought after they crossed the Jordan, and that it was not until the time of Solomon that the country had rest from war.

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